AMANDA LIA ROGERS

Crown Range TURK

tramping, huts, travelAmanda RogersComment
Crown Range Turk (not a yurt, not a tank) is a prototype hut built by Erik Bradshaw, situated on Glencoe station out the back of Arrowtown. Built as a ski-touring base for his family, friends and backcountry travellers, it’s also perfectly situated for overnighting trampers. The solar panels power heating, continuous ventilation, lighting and USB charge; this is absolute hut luxury, complete with an armchair and hut slippers. Not to mention that the practicals (gas/cooker and utensils) are taken care of. If I were to add anything it would be art, but then you have the form of those surrounding hills and that light…! The long way up (via Crown Peak) takes 3.5 hours, the short route direct from Bracken Gully up the spur, 2 hours. You could follow the range northward to reach Cardrona in another 4 hours, via Mt. Sale.

Crown Range Turk (not a yurt, not a tank) is a prototype hut built by Erik Bradshaw, situated on Glencoe station out the back of Arrowtown. Built as a ski-touring base for his family, friends and backcountry travellers, it’s also perfectly situated for overnighting trampers. The solar panels power heating, continuous ventilation, lighting and USB charge; this is absolute hut luxury, complete with an armchair and hut slippers. Not to mention that the practicals (gas/cooker and utensils) are taken care of. If I were to add anything it would be art, but then you have the form of those surrounding hills and that light…! The long way up (via Crown Peak) takes 3.5 hours, the short route direct from Bracken Gully up the spur, 2 hours. You could follow the range northward to reach Cardrona in another 4 hours, via Mt. Sale.

At the snowline, looking to Arrow Junction and Wakatipu beyond

At the snowline, looking to Arrow Junction and Wakatipu beyond

Crown Peak views of Wanaka (that bluey valley) and the Pisa range (right)

Crown Peak views of Wanaka (that bluey valley) and the Pisa range (right)

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Happy Dave with Whittakers & whisky

Happy Dave with Whittakers & whisky

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KōKAKO SURVEYING

Amanda RogersComment
Flieder at home in Parininihi. Flieder is one of the founding birds released in 2017 after an absence of kōkako from the region for over 30 years. He was translocated from Tiritiri Matangi, chosen because he has Taranaki ancestry that survived from the days when the last remaining Taranaki kōkako were captured and taken into the care of Pukaha Mt. Bruce; their offspring moved to other predator free environments. Finally the time came to reintroduce the species to the Taranaki region after years of concerted predator control efforts, in the hope that they will breed and become a self-sustaining population once again. Unfortunately, Flieder has paired with his sister Narangi and their attempts to produce fertile eggs thus far have been in vain! Still, with a multitude of unrelated Pureora birds being released earlier this year, and other Tiritiri pairings fledging chicks, we hope he’ll figure out one day that he has other options.

Flieder at home in Parininihi. Flieder is one of the founding birds released in 2017 after an absence of kōkako from the region for over 30 years. He was translocated from Tiritiri Matangi, chosen because he has Taranaki ancestry that survived from the days when the last remaining Taranaki kōkako were captured and taken into the care of Pukaha Mt. Bruce; their offspring moved to other predator free environments. Finally the time came to reintroduce the species to the Taranaki region after years of concerted predator control efforts, in the hope that they will breed and become a self-sustaining population once again. Unfortunately, Flieder has paired with his sister Narangi and their attempts to produce fertile eggs thus far have been in vain! Still, with a multitude of unrelated Pureora birds being released earlier this year, and other Tiritiri pairings fledging chicks, we hope he’ll figure out one day that he has other options.

The scene from the deck, Chateau Kōkako, Hunua. Hunua is a relict population that was reduced to just one female kōkako (and more than a dozen males) by 1994 after decades of rampant mammalian depredation and no human intervention. They’re now up to 106 pairs within managed areas, including some 37 birds translocated to add genetic diversity.

The scene from the deck, Chateau Kōkako, Hunua. Hunua is a relict population that was reduced to just one female kōkako (and more than a dozen males) by 1994 after decades of rampant mammalian depredation and no human intervention. They’re now up to 106 pairs within managed areas, including some 37 birds translocated to add genetic diversity.

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Northern Territory

Amanda RogersComment
Larapinta Trail, Sections Four, Five and Six: Crossing the Chewings and Heavitree Ranges

Larapinta Trail, Sections Four, Five and Six: Crossing the Chewings and Heavitree Ranges

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Lillies, Hugh Gorge. The first pond for 31 kms, 36 hours.

Lillies, Hugh Gorge. The first pond for 31 kms, 36 hours.

Brinkley Bluff

Brinkley Bluff

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On to Kakadu: Maguk waterhole. Full of fish and croc-free!

On to Kakadu: Maguk waterhole. Full of fish and croc-free!

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Plumed Whistling-ducks, Yellow Water

Plumed Whistling-ducks, Yellow Water

Yellow Water!

Yellow Water!

Gunlom

Gunlom

Katherine Gorge

Katherine Gorge

No shortage of portage during the Dry - it probably took more time than the paddling. Luckily the whole thing is so spectacular, none more than the fifth and sixth gorges.

No shortage of portage during the Dry - it probably took more time than the paddling. Luckily the whole thing is so spectacular, none more than the fifth and sixth gorges.

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Great Bowerbird (technical term), Litchfield National Park. Such an Attenborough moment watching him tenderly thatch this bower, which is a display chamber, not a nest, and fastidiously decorate it with green and white objects to impress the ladies. At the campsite that meant mozzie coils and discarded tinfoil, as well as the regular old shells and melaleuca.

Great Bowerbird (technical term), Litchfield National Park. Such an Attenborough moment watching him tenderly thatch this bower, which is a display chamber, not a nest, and fastidiously decorate it with green and white objects to impress the ladies. At the campsite that meant mozzie coils and discarded tinfoil, as well as the regular old shells and melaleuca.