AMANDA LIA ROGERS

KōKAKO SURVEYING

Amanda RogersComment
Flieder at home in Parininihi. Flieder is one of the founding birds released in 2017 after an absence of kōkako from the region for over 30 years. He was translocated from Tiritiri Matangi, chosen because he has Taranaki ancestry that survived from the days when the last remaining Taranaki kōkako were captured and taken into the care of Pukaha Mt. Bruce; their offspring moved to other predator free environments. Finally the time came to reintroduce the species to the Taranaki region after years of concerted predator control efforts, in the hope that they will breed and become a self-sustaining population once again. Unfortunately, Flieder has paired with his sister Narangi and their attempts to produce fertile eggs thus far have been in vain! Still, with a multitude of unrelated Pureora birds being released earlier this year, and other Tiritiri pairings fledging chicks, we hope he’ll figure out one day that he has other options.

Flieder at home in Parininihi. Flieder is one of the founding birds released in 2017 after an absence of kōkako from the region for over 30 years. He was translocated from Tiritiri Matangi, chosen because he has Taranaki ancestry that survived from the days when the last remaining Taranaki kōkako were captured and taken into the care of Pukaha Mt. Bruce; their offspring moved to other predator free environments. Finally the time came to reintroduce the species to the Taranaki region after years of concerted predator control efforts, in the hope that they will breed and become a self-sustaining population once again. Unfortunately, Flieder has paired with his sister Narangi and their attempts to produce fertile eggs thus far have been in vain! Still, with a multitude of unrelated Pureora birds being released earlier this year, and other Tiritiri pairings fledging chicks, we hope he’ll figure out one day that he has other options.

The scene from the deck, Chateau Kōkako, Hunua. Hunua is a relict population that was reduced to just one female kōkako (and more than a dozen males) by 1994 after decades of rampant mammalian depredation and no human intervention. They’re now up to 106 pairs within managed areas, including some 37 birds translocated to add genetic diversity.

The scene from the deck, Chateau Kōkako, Hunua. Hunua is a relict population that was reduced to just one female kōkako (and more than a dozen males) by 1994 after decades of rampant mammalian depredation and no human intervention. They’re now up to 106 pairs within managed areas, including some 37 birds translocated to add genetic diversity.

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